Category Archives: Health

“Pulling the Trigger” By Adam Shaw and Lauren Callaghan

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I’ve recently reviewed the book, “Pulling the Trigger” by Adam Shaw and Lauren Callaghan. What brought my attention to this book? Anxiety. After the birth of my son, I suffered a bit from anxiety issues, triggered by the fact that he had many health problems when he was born and as a new mom I felt extremely overwhelmed. Thankfully, my son’s health has gotten much better (I thank God for this everyday!)  and I am also doing better but still very interested in topics related to anxiety. When I read the book “Pulling the Trigger” by Adam Shaw and Lauren Callaghan, I felt that Shaw really understood what mental illness is and how to deal with these issues. He was very open about his own struggles, how he went through life trying to deal with OCD, anxiety and depression and how he attempted to get the help he needed. He ultimately found this help through Clinical Psychologist Lauren Callaghan.

I thought it would be a good idea to talk to him about this topic.

In a phone interview from the countryside of the United Kingdom, Shaw spoke about   “Pulling the Trigger” saying it  focuses on a compassionate, straightforward and unique approach to support sufferers recovery from mental health issues and he talks about his struggles with OCD, anxiety, panic attacks, and depression.

Shaw says that when he wrote the book with Lauren Callaghan, he thought about his own mental health issues and what he would want from a self help book. “They need to have help, they need to see that somebody else is going through it,” he says.

Shaw suffered mental health problems since childhood. He had thoughts he was going to harm people, he had obsessive compulsive disorder, anxiety and severe depression. “I thought I was crazy,” he says.

“During the time we were taught how to eat healthy and exercise but there was no curriculum for mental health. You would just hear the negative things on the news about crazy people doing crazy things. I thought I was going to be taken away – end up locked up,” adds Shaw. He says that having worry and anxiety played a pivotal role in adding fear to his thoughts and adding even more anxiety. His thoughts became more sinister and turned his life upside down – then he was officially diagnosed with OCD but was being treated in the wrong way. Shaw says he went to a point where he was going to end it all – anxiety and panic left him contemplating suicide.

“That’s when I ended up on the ledge of a bridge. Ironically, I found this to be the first time I didn’t feel anxious and the only reason was because I knew I was going to end it and it couldn’t get me anymore – for the first time in my life I was relaxed.” Fortunately, that is also when he realized that he could possibly get better so he sought the help of Clinical Psychologist Lauren Callaghan.

“Lauren told me, “Why don’t you have the courage to face your fears and walk towards it, if you allow the bad thoughts in, you also allow the good thoughts in. Your thoughts will be desensitized when you face them, don’t add meaning to them.”

Shaw believes that the majority of mental health problems especially anxiety based ones like depression and OCD affect a lot of people and go untreated. “A lot of this can be resolved just by educating people,” says Shaw.

“Pulling the Trigger” is a book with a philanthropist element says Shaw. “We want to educate people on why they have the mental health issue. We can help people feel better. This book is about improving lives and helping others because our proceeds go to our charity where we help people who are in socially deprived areas that don’t have the medical care they need for survival,” he says. These books are not a commercial venture says Shaw. He made his money and sold his company a few years ago which employed about 1,000 people. “The idea was to launch a global charity where we could help children and parents with mental health – create and sell books with a philanthropic purpose. It goes to helping vulnerable people in dire and desperate situations. A lot of people are suffering needlessly,” he says.

Shaw says, “Life’s a journey – I’m very healthy now. It’s the first time in my life I feel right. I am doing something I really enjoy and am looking forward to helping as many people as possible.”

Check out Shaw’s global charity The Shaw Mind Foundation www.shawmindfoundation.org and website www.pulling-the-trigger.com

Adam Shaw and Lauren Callaghan
Adam Shaw and Lauren Callaghan

¿Que es Alfa 1 Antitripsina?

 

Gracias a Elisabeth Sperling por la foto.
Gracias a Elisabeth Sperling por la foto.

Alfa 1 antitripsina es una enfermedad genética que afecta a 1 de cada 1.500 a 3.500 individuos de ascendencia europea. Este trastorno puede causar enfermedades pulmonares y enfermedades del hígado, con los primeros signos y síntomas de la enfermedad de pulmón o el hígado que se muestran entre las edades de 20 y 50. El problema que causa esta deficiencia genética es que no permite que el cuerpo produsca suficiente enzima para proteger a los pulmones y el hígado contra la exposición a los contaminantes que son potencialmente peligrosos. Personas que tiene esta deficiencia son menos protegido y tienen mayor probabilidad de desarrollar un problema.

Muchas personas están sin diagnosticar hasta que desarrollan una enfermedad pulmonar llamada enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica (EPOC) o enfermedad hepática. El problema es que las personas que no saben que tienen este trastorno genético pueden involucrarse con estilos de vida poco saludables, como fumar, beber, vivir en zonas contaminadas con mala calidad del aire o mantenerse en ocupaciones peligrosas.  Algunas de estas ocupaciones son la lucha contra incendios, pintura de coches, o minería. Estas pueden afectar directamente a la gravedad y la evolución de la enfermedad.

Por eso, es bueno saber si usted lleva esta deficiencia genética. Si desea hacerse la prueba, lo puede hacer a través de esta impresionante organización, Fundación Alpha-1 http://www.alpha1.org.

La prueba es gratuita y confidencial. Se proporciona a través de https://www.alpha1.org/Newly-Diagnosed/Learning-about-Alpha-1/Testing-for-Alpha-1

E empezado a correr la voz acerca de este trastorno genético. En esta foto estoy enseñando a un grupo de los detalles de alfa 1 antitripsina. Vine a saber acerca de este trastorno genético cuando mi hijo fue diagnosticado con esta deficiencia a los 6 meses de edad. Afortunadamente mi hijo sólo es ligeramente deficiente por lo que sólo hay que asegurarse de que tome decisiones inteligentes y lleve un estilo de vida saludable – no fumar, no beber alcohol, comer saludable, hacer ejercicio y mantenerse alejado de las zonas altamente contaminadas y puestos de trabajo que pueden aumentar el riesgo de problemas respiratorios.

Yo e hecho la prueba y también tengo la deficiencia. Ahora estoy poniendo a prueba mi familia ya que este es un problema genético que se transmite a través de la familia.

A la Salud!

 

The genetic disorder many of us have and don’t know about.

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Thank you Elisabeth Sperling for this picture of me!

Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Deficiency is a genetic disorder that affects about 1 in 1,500 to 3,500 individuals from European ancestry. This disorder may cause lung disease and liver disease, with the first signs and symptoms of lung or liver disease showing up between ages 20 and 50. The problem this genetic deficiency causes is that it does not let the body produce enough enzyme to protect the lungs and liver against exposures to potentially hazardous pollutants.  So the less protected we are, the higher the chance of developing a problem.

Many individuals are undiagnosed until they develop a lung condition called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or liver disease. The problem is that people who don’t know they have this genetic disorder may get involved with unhealthy lifestyles such as smoking, drinking, living in polluted areas with bad air quality and hold hazardous occupations such as firefighting, car painting,or mining that can directly affect the severity and outcome of the disease.

That is why it’s good to know if you carry the genetic deficiency. If you’d like to get tested, do it through this awesome organization, Alpha-1 Foundation http://www.alpha1.org.

The test is free and confidential. It is provided through https://www.alpha1.org/Newly-Diagnosed/Learning-about-Alpha-1/Testing-for-Alpha-1 

I’ve started spreading the word about this genetic disorder. Here I am teaching a group about the details of Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Deficiency. I came to know about this genetic disorder when my son was diagnosed with it at 6 months of age. Thankfully he is only slightly deficient so we just have to make sure he makes smart decisions and leads a healthy lifestyle – no smoking, eats healthy, gets plenty of exercise and stays away from highly polluted areas and jobs that can increase risk of respiratory issues. I’ve been tested and also have the deficiency. Now I’m getting my family tested since this is a genetic issue that is passed on through family.

Be Careful of Black Henna Tattoos

Image from Flickr: Evonne

Image from Flickr: Evonne

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the temporary black henna tattoo used in place of the traditional henna can be potentially harmful to some people. The ink used in henna may actually be hair dye or a mix of other ingredients such as a coal-tar hair dye containing p-phenylenediamine (PPD), “which can cause dangerous reactions in some people” according to the FDA By law, this PPD chemical is not permitted in cosmetics used to stain the skin. The report states that these black henna tattoos may be used in temporary tattoo kiosks at beaches, boardwalks as well as ethnic or specialty shops. Depending on the state, it’s possible no one is checking the safe practices of the artist. Some people have had bad reactions to this black henna temporary tattoo occurring within immediate contact to two to three weeks later. Some reported problems include redness, blisters, raised red weeping lesions, loss of pigmentation, increased sensitivity to sunlight, permanent scarring and ongoing skin sensitivity.

 

If you have a reaction to or concern about a temporary tattoo or any other cosmetic, contact your health care professional. In addition, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) asks you to contact FDA’s Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program at 1-800-FDA-1088 or online at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/default.htm. You can also contact an FDA consumer complaint coordinator in your area. A list of coordinators can be found at: http://www.fda.gov/safety/reportaproblem/consumercomplaintcoordinators